5 Self defence tips for kids

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In the era of #metoo, it is more important that ever that we teach our kids ways in which they can speak up and stand up against bullies and harassment in all shape and forms.

if your child is unprepared and unaware of what bullying can look like, he or she might experience it and not be able to express whats happening. It doesn’t serve any child to be defenseless when it comes to bullying, and the best way to empower them is to prepare your child in advance. Have a conversation with your child on how to deal with bullying what the signs to look out for are before it happens.

When most people think of self-defense, they think of hitting back. the essence of self-defense has nothing to do using violence or striking someone. It’s about being aware of your surroundings, listening to your gut, knowing when to leave before a an issue gets out of hand and learning how to use a (confident) your voice and how to stand up for yourself. Here are five strategies children can use to defend themselves against bullies.

Trust your instinct.

Teach your kids to be aware of their surroundings. If something doesn’t feel right it’s important to be more vigilant. It is crucial that we teach our kids to listen to the inner voice and pay attention. Being aware of what’s going on around them will help them assess a situation based on the information their surroundings is giving them. Trusting their instincts will not only will help protect your child from bullying but it is also an important life skill. The earlier they can learn to be aware of it the easier it will be to trust their instincts.

Building Confidence.

A great way in preventing bullying is to build self-esteem in your child which will give them a boost in confidence. Having good posture, making eye contact and verbal assertiveness by speaking up when necessary. By contrast, if a child slouch and keep their eyes averted, it can make them appear to be an easy target. Work with your children on these techniques. And awaken the power that lies within so they don’t feel helpless.

Flight over Fight

Too often children have hard time realizing when asituation is heading in the wrong direction and when to walk away. Our job as a parents is to teach them that walking away from a bad situation is not being weak or cowardly. On the contrary, it takes courage to walk away from a situation that is escalating.

Using self-defense techniques

Although you shouldn’t encourage your child to fight, there are certain self-defense techniques they can use to protect themselves when attacked. For instance, there are techniques for blocking a punch that is thrown at them. There are also techniques for removing a bully’s fingers from their wrists as well as techniques on how to get free when being restrained. And there are techniques on how they can defend themselves from a group attack. All these strategies can be learned in a self-defense class.
Remember, when teaching your kids about self-defense skills against bullies, encourage them to diffuse the situation by using a strong voice or walking away. Also, Make sure your kids know that it is acceptable and encouraged to make a lot of noise if someone is threatening them or hurting them.

Taking a Self-defense class.

One great thing you can do is to enrol your child in a self-defense class. There are many options out there for kids of all ages, find one that suits your child and where they can have fun. Your child will not only learn how to defend themselves, but also build their confidence and teach them discipline. Most times, diffusing a verbal bullying involves knowing how to respond verbal assertiveness with confidence before it can ever evolve to physical bullying. These are the steps we can all take as parents to teach our kids how to stand up for themselves.
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4 Life changing Benefits Of Intermittent Fasting

 

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Intermittent fasting has become one of the most controversial concepts of discussion for anyone looking to shed weight. The idea has grown significantly over the past several years.

Everyone from the biggest celebrities, to George St-Pierre, a three-time former UFC Welterweight Champion practice intermittent fasting. To someone who is new to intermittent fasting, however, there may be a lot of information to take in, so it’s important to do ample research.

If you are intrigued by intermittent fasting and want to how it works, you first need to satisfy the question of what intermittent fasting can do for you. What can you get out of it? And what can you expect?

I personally practice intermittent fasting 2-3 times a week. Here are four benefits of intermittent fasting that I have discovered .

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1) Weight loss

One great benefit of intermittent fasting, is the significant weight lost without a calorie-restricted diet. Furthermore, it helps keep the weight off in the long term. Celebrities and fitness experts harp on intermittent fasting’s amazing transformational effects. From Wolverine himself, Mr. Hugh Jackman, to UFC legend Georges St-Pierre, different people from all over the world have detailed how intermittent fasting has changed their lives.

By adhering to a time-restricted eating schedule, intermittent fasting assists practitioners eat less calories without it feeling like you’re on a restrictive diet.

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2) Reduces the risk of developing diabetes

As more and more people in the world are affected by diabetes, one of the best ways to combat this life threatening conditioning is through exercise and a healthy balanced diet.

Intermittent fasting is a great tool to help you fight against diabetes and reverse its effects overall. Recent studies have suggested intermittent fasting may also be able to stop diabetes in its tracks. Studies revealed that intermittent fasting harbors the production of new pancreatic cells which replace old dysfunctional ones, helps reduce insulin resistance which in turn keeps blood sugar levels under control.

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3) Strong and healthy brain

Improved healthy brain function is one of the greatest benefits of intermittent fasting, helping to prevent and manage neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. The act of resisting the temptation to eat during a fasting window is a mental challenge that causes the human brain to take preventative measures against various diseases.

In fact, most practitioners of intermittent fasting have raved about the challenge that it presents. After some time, the body makes personal adjustments to ones eating schedule, hence the constant hunger subsides which is why some switch things up and work with various methods of intermittent fasting.

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4) The body burns fat

Our bodies have been trained to use sugar and carbohydrates as the primary source for energy. The unused calories from sugar and carbohydrates left in the system, gets stored as fat.

Intermittent fasting trains our bodies to use fat as energy and not sugar, as humans were designed to do in the early days of man. The human body was made to withstand long periods of fasting which leads the body expending energy from stored fat.

The fasting window buys our bodies time to deplete our glycogen stores, causing us to burn fat instead of sugar for energy. This state the body enters is known as Ketosis, or more popularly coined today as Keto. Ketones boost energy levels and decrease brain fog.

3 Best Bodyweight Triceps Exercises – Strong Dad

The best exercises to target the triceps with just your bodyweight. These exercises will purely isolate the triceps when you do them right!

1.Parallel Dips – In my opinion the best triceps builder, dips are a effective muscle builder. Grasp the bars with a neutral grip. Keep your body in an upright position and with your arms by your sides, lower your body until you reach at least a 90 degree angle at your elbows. While you press back up, keep your arms by your sides and maintain that upright body posture.
I usually do 4 or 5 sets of 10 to 15 reps. As a beginner i would recommend you 3 sets of 5 reps.

2.Bench Dips – The bench dip is a good start for those not accustomed to a full-fledged parallel bar dip. Grab the end of a bench with both hands behind you with a shoulder-width grip and your legs straight with your heels on the floor.
I usually do 4 or 5 sets of 20 to 25 reps. As a beginner i would recommend you 3 sets of 10 reps.

3.Close Grip Push up – The close grip push up is a variation of the push up that focuses on hitting the triceps. Begin in plank position with the arms and body straight, shoulders over the wrists. Keep the core engaged. Bend the elbows behind you and lower your chest to the floor. Keep your upper arms tight to your body so your elbows are against your ribs on both sides. Straighten the arms, coming back to plank position.
I usually do 20-30-40-30-20 reps. As a beginner i would recommend you 5-10-5 reps.

7 ways to do chin ups

Who hasn´t heard about pull ups? It’s one of my top exercises, because it works your entire upper body. A lot of people find it a very difficult exercise and therefor skip it altogether. Too bad, because pull ups have so many benefits. Let’s take a look at the different ways to do pull ups + check out my own secret pull up routine at the end.

 

When it comes to body-weight exercises, they don’t come much tougher than the wide-grip pullup. Even if you’re a competent chin-up master, you’ll find the wide-grip much more taxing. This can be a good thing, though, as switching to a wider hand spacing recruits different muscles and gives your training new purpose.

  1. Using a pronated grip, grasp the pull bar with a wider than shoulder width grip.
  2. Take a deep breath, squeeze your glutes and brace your abs. Depress the shoulder blades and then drive the elbows straight down to the floor while activating the lats.
  3. Pull your chin towards the bar until the lats are fully contracted, then slowly lower yourself back to the start position and repeat for the assigned number of repetitions.

 

A MUST DO in the U.S. Army! This exercise develops the ability to pull the body upward while hanging with an alternating grip.

  1. Keeping the body straight, pull upward, allowing the head to move to the left or right side of the bar and touch the left or right shoulder to the bar.
  2. Return to the starting position.

 

A proper chin-up (a chin-up is not a pull-up) is one of the best upper body exercises because it works so many different muscles at the same time. It’s known as a compound exercise because it works more than one joint — your elbow and shoulder joints have to do an incredible amount of work to pull you up to the bar.

  1. Grab the pull-up bar with the palms facing your torso and a grip closer than the shoulder width.
  2. As you have both arms extended in front of you holding the bar at the chosen grip width, keep your torso as straight as possible while creating a curvature on your lower back and sticking your chest out. This is your starting position.
  3. As you breathe out, pull your torso up until your head is around the level of the pull-up bar. Concentrate on using the biceps muscles in order to perform the movement. Keep the elbows close to your body.

 

Time to work those shoulders real good. The behind-the-neck pull-ups can be a bit difficult, but the payoff is worth it. The range of motion is a bit different than most other pull-ups, and the middle of your back is gonna feel it here.

Wide-grip is where it’s at; once you’re ready and your arms are fully extended, pull yourself up and let them come behind you rather, rather than in front. Don’t over-extend your neck, and make sure you don’t feel any pain while doing this exercise… unless it’s a good pain.

  1. Grasp the pull-up bar with your hands a bit less than 2 shoulder widths apart. Keep your entire body straight and extend your knees. This way you can’t create momentum with your legs. Also contract your abdominals slightly (don’t hollow your back). Start with your arms almost extended.
  2. Then pull yourself up in front of the bar and exhale. Let the upper back or the neck touch the pull-up bar. Don’t swing your legs or hollow your back.
  3. Move back down slowly and inhale at the same time. The down motion should be slower than the up motion. If you let yourself fall, you can injure your elbows.

 

Same as the wide grip pull up, just on the money bar.

  1. Take a wide grip on a monkey-up bar, hanging freely with your arms extended. This will be your starting position.
  2. Pull yourself up by flexing the elbows and adducting the glenohumeral joint. Do not swing or use momentum to complete the movement. Attempt to get your chin above your hands.
  3. Pause at the top of the motion before lowering yourself to the starting position.

 


Hammer grip pull ups are easier on the wrists and shoulders and strongly recruit both the biceps and brachialis, as opposed to just the biceps (as in chin-ups) or the brachioradialis (as in pull-ups).

  1. Start off standing in front of a assisted pull up machine and grab the hammer grip section of the bar.
  2. Lift your feet up off of the floor and pull up slowly, squeezing tightly on your lats until your shoulders are at level with your head.
  3. Hold this position for a count then return back to the starting position.

 

Close grip pull ups are an awesome exercise that work later, biceps, shoulders and forearms.

  1. Grab the bar with a shoulder width grip (or slightly narrower), the palms facing away from your face
  2. Pull yourself up by flexing the elbows and extending the arms until the bars is adjacent to the upper part of your chest and try to get your body as high as possible to achieve optimal contraction of the muscles included.
  3. After reaching the peak position, lower yourself in a controlled and slow manner until you return to the original position. Repeat

My personal personal training routine consists of BJJ, Grappling, MMA & Boxing. Everyone who has ever done those sports in a competitive manner, knows you can’t do them everyday. Pull ups are a great way for me to train my body, without “over training” it. I personally try my very best to avoid weight lifting and have never been a fan of it. Therefore I train at least once a week on the pull up bar. After doing some warm up I straight go for the pull up bar. I call my routine “ladder” I start with 1, then 2, 3, 4… all the way up to 10 – from there I go down again 9,8,7… until 1 – it’s an amazing exercise and if you can’t go straight away from 10 then do 3 (1-2-3-2-1) and then go up from there.